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Lineage to St. Clotilde of the Franks:
brought to you by Denise in New York

St. Clotilde (click for pics)
474
-
545
married
Clovis
466
-
511
Clotaire I
497
-
561
married
Arnegundis
518
-
587
Chilpheric
c
540
-
584
Clotaire II
584
-
629
Dagobert I
603
-
639
Rotilde/Regintrude
c
632
-
Antoine
c
650
-
Bouchard
c
680
-
Estorede
c
710
-
Lideric II
c
750
-
Englegram
790
-
a851
Odoacre
810
-
864
Baldwin I with the iron arm
840
-
879
Raoul Cambray
865
-
896
Isaac Advocate Remi
c
886
-
947
Jean Lens
c
928
-
968
Jean Castillian Lens
b953
-
a1007
Jean Bousies
c
965
-
1047
Jean
1043
-
a1077
Baldwin I
1076
-
a1125
Baldwin II
1113
-
1145
Baldwin III
1144
-
a1185
Baldwin IV
1184
-
1239
Baldwin V
1216
-
1287
William Des Marets
1244
-
a1306
Baldwin VI
1276
-
1331
Baldwin VII
1315
-
a1351
Baldwin VIII
c
1350
-
1395
Hugo Des Marets
1380
-
1429
Reginald Des Marets
1415
-
a1451
Jean Des Marets
1450
-
a1481
Jacques Des Marets
1519
-
1604
Francois Des Marets
1555
-
a1601
Anna Des Marets
1598
-
1674
married
Jobst Agnet von Colln
1579
-
1663
Johannes von Colln
1625
-
1673
Barthold von Colln
1660
-
1720
Georg Arnold A. von Colln
1686
-
1754
Barthold von Colln (II)
1717
-
1801
Johann H.A.G. von Colln
1760
-
1830
Christian von Colln
1824
-
1887
Wilhelm von Colln
1853
-
1938
Gustav Wilhelm von Colln
1896
-
1977
Frederich William Von Colln
1942
-
John Robert Gustav Von Colln (web author)
1978
-

Most of this took place before last names were fully in place, so it may look like just a list of unrelated names, but it is in fact, parent to child, parent to child and so on...

There have been many, many stories and biographies written about St. Clotilde. I will try to sum up the essence of her life and her surroundings and her legacy...
She was born a Princess. Her father was the King of Burgandy, and this was at a time when France was not France yet, and Germany was not Germany yet. Europe was made up of many smaller Kingdoms. There was one King who began conquering his surrounding Kingdoms and united them under his one rule. He was now known as Clovis I, King of the Franks. He heard of the slaughter of Chilperic II, King of Burgandy, and how a priest took and hid the child Clotilde and keep her out of harm's way. She now lived as a young girl within a convent, but continually reached out to help those in need in the surrounding area. It was with this information that the over-King, Clovis, sent someone in disguise to test the virtue of the young Princess. She, without hesitation, welcomed the unfortunate soul, and shared food with him. King Clovis admired such a person, who possessed strong character, generosity and compassion, and Clovis I made arrangement for Princess Clotilde to come to him and he married her. King Clovis was a pagan, and the now Queen Clotilde was a Catholic. They had their first son, and he tried to please her, by allowing the infant to be baptized. The infant died, and Clovis blamed Clotilde's God, and he continued to aggressively slaughter in battle with rage in his heart. Not long after Clovis and his men were LOOSING a battle and most likely to be killed. He immediately began praying to Clotilde's God and when the danger was subsequently lifted, he promised to honor such a God, and gave all his commanding officers and all his under-rulers of all the territories he ruled the choice to join him and become Christians. Clovis and his two sisters, and most of his men and rulers were then baptized, and Clovis, under the influence of his wife, Clotilde, changed the complexion of Europe. It now became Christian, and Clovis altered his barbaric ways and did much good after this.
There was much upheaval in the lives of such rulers, and Clovis and Clotilde's children and grandchildren were always in jeopardy. She ended up raising most of her grandchildren, some of whom were eventually murdered by jealous enemies. One who escaped, was her grandson, who later became St. Cloud. St. Cloud had no children of his own, but we are descended from another son of Clotilde's, whose name, as you see in the chart above, was Clotaire I. This Clotaire I, had several wives, (two of whom were actual sisters), but we are descended from the wife named Arnegundis. Clotaire made arrangements to be buried royally in a Cathedral, but now archaeologists have found the grave of our Arnegundis, and have been able to reconstruct much about her status and image by the jewelry found about her skeleton.